CBCT BASICS PDF

At the end of the course, participants will be able to: Demonstrate detailed knowledge of anatomy of the tooth-bearing portions of maxilla and mandible Understand artefacts that may occur in CBCT images Determine the location and orientation of impacted teeth and relationship to ID canal, maxillary sinus and other adjacent structures Correlate CBCT scans with conventional 2D radiographs Handle CBCT datasets for various clinical applications Use radiological terminology to describe abnormalities Describe important diseases including malignancy affecting the dento-alveolar regions Write CBCT interpretation reports for the dento-alveolar regions Identify when to refer cases for a second opinion or over-read Format The course combines theoretical and practical aspects of radiological interpretation. Participants will be given a chance to practise many clinical case studies which will work develop their confidence in the handling of datasets and interpretation of findings. The small group teaching format will enable each participant to gain personal tutor attention and enable them to progress at their own pace. Laptop computers will be provided to minimise disruption. More and more dentists are using them to diagnose complex clinical problems.

Author:Faubar Kigakus
Country:Sri Lanka
Language:English (Spanish)
Genre:Medical
Published (Last):13 April 2016
Pages:183
PDF File Size:9.70 Mb
ePub File Size:16.4 Mb
ISBN:872-7-74216-261-2
Downloads:86663
Price:Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader:Kazragul



With advancements in technology, it is rapidly replacing many diagnostic radiographic procedures. In this article, we will outline the basic science behind CT scans, describe the principles of interpretation, and highlight their advantages and drawbacks compared to other imaging techniques.

The scanner emits x-rays towards the patient from a variety of angles — and the detectors in the scanner measure the difference between the x-rays that are absorbed by the body, and x-rays that are transmitted through the body. This is called attenuation. The amount of attenuation is determined by the density of the imaged tissue, and they are individually assigned a Hounsfield Unit or CT Number. Conventional x-rays provide the radiographer with a two-dimensional image, and require the patient to be moved manually to image the same region from a different angle.

In contrast, because of the advanced mathematical algorithms involved with CT, the three-dimensional planes of the human body can be imaged and displayed on a monitor as stacked images, detailing the entirety of the field of interest.

This is accomplished by acquiring projections from different angles and through a process known as reconstruction, the three-dimensional data is viewable on a two-dimensional monitor. The data collected can theoretically never be a perfect replica of what is being scanned, but is a close enough representation to be used for medical diagnostic purposes.

The introduction of an intravenous radiofluorescent contrast into the bloodstream can be used for a variety of diagnostic purposes, for example: Used to visualise the cardiovascular system e. Used to identify whether a tumour is malignant. After approximately 7 minutes after an intravenous injection with iodinated CT contrast, the contrast begins to expel from the body via the urinary system.

The contrast can be seen in the ureters going into the bladder creating a CT Urogram; a procedure that is commonly replacing the traditional intravenous pyelogram seen in radiography. Oral contrast can also be administered if investigation is required of the digestive system.

Radiologists will often use images reconstructed in the coronal and sagittal plane to help supplement their diagnosis. The Image The density of the body tissue determines the degree to which the x-rays are attenuated.

In turn, this affects the brightness and contrast of the imaged tissues. This is quantified by the Hounsfield Scale of radiodensity. Tissues with a high Hounsfield score have a high attenuation coefficient, and so appear white: Substance.

LOS RITUALES DEL CAOS MONSIVAIS PDF

Computed Tomography (CT) Scanning

With advancements in technology, it is rapidly replacing many diagnostic radiographic procedures. In this article, we will outline the basic science behind CT scans, describe the principles of interpretation, and highlight their advantages and drawbacks compared to other imaging techniques. The scanner emits x-rays towards the patient from a variety of angles — and the detectors in the scanner measure the difference between the x-rays that are absorbed by the body, and x-rays that are transmitted through the body. This is called attenuation. The amount of attenuation is determined by the density of the imaged tissue, and they are individually assigned a Hounsfield Unit or CT Number. Conventional x-rays provide the radiographer with a two-dimensional image, and require the patient to be moved manually to image the same region from a different angle.

DRACONIAN GRIMOIRE PDF

Basics of Cone Beam CT for the Dental Practitioner

.

ORACLE SOA SUITE 11G DEVELOPER GUIDE PDF

The Basic Principles of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT)

.

ERIC HAZAN LQR PDF

Basics of Dento-alveolar CBCT Interpretation

.

Related Articles